Mathematical Biology Laboratory Department of Biology, Kyushu University

Takahiro Kamioka

NAME

Takahiro Kamioka

Email: t.kamioka.530[at]gmail.com
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CURRENT POSITION

Doctorate course student, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Shimane University, Japan, 2015 (Life and Environmental Science)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Evolution of density response and juvenile hormone regulation in wing polymorphic insects

Yusuke Ito

NAME

Yusuke Ito

Email: uks3tkwbft[at]gmail.com
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CURRENT POSITION

Doctorate course student, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

(Ⅰ) Modeling nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection in vitro

Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) accumulates their mutants by both recombination and mutation during the course of the infection. HIV-1 recombination, as well as HIV-1 infection, is likely to be promoted more effectively by “co-infection” events. The co-infection of HIV-1 is defined that multiple viruses infect target cells simultaneously. Recently, it has been experimentally confirmed “nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection”, a phenomenon in which multiple viruses target cells in cell culture, occurs more frequently than it would be expected. One possible explanation for the nonrandomness is a heterogeneity of susceptibility of target cells, proposed by Q. Dang et al., 2004. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model for “nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection” and quantitatively analyzed the datasets of co-infection experiments. First, we derived the stochastic model including the heterogeneity of susceptibility of cells. Interestingly, the model allows us to predict theoretically that nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection is more likely to happen under our assumptions, as previous works have suggested experimentally. In addition, as the results of quantitative analyses of experimental co-infection datasets using the model, we could estimate the number of viruses to invade target cells under the nonrandom co-infection cases. These information will be useful for further understanding not only the impact of co-infections on the frequency of HIV-1 recombination but also the diversity of HIV-1.

Shoya Iwanami

NAME

Shoya Iwanami

Email: iwanami.shoya.634[at]s.kyushu-u.ac.jp
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CURRENT POSITION

Doctorate course student, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Hematopoietic stem cell

Akane Hara

NAME

Akane Hara

Email: hara.akane32a[at]gmail.com
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CURRENT POSITION

Doctorate course student, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Mathematical modeling of allergen immunotherapy

Takaaki Funo

NAME

Takaaki Funo

Email: funo-8va[at]live.jp
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CURRENT POSITION

Doctorate course student, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)

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