Mathematical Biology Laboratory Department of Biology, Kyushu University

Kenji Yoshida

NAME

Kenji Yoshida

Email: false_saffron[at]yahoo.co.jp
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2013 (Biology)

Yusuke Kakizoe

NAME

Yusuke Kakizoe

Email: yusuke.purple5[at]gmail.com
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists, DC1

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2014 (Biology)
  • M.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Mathematical Biology)

Shinsuke Satoi

NAME

Shinsuke Satoi

Email: ssatoi257n[at]gmail.com
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists, DC1

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2014 (Biology)
  • M.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Mathematical Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Leuckart’s Law states that among vertebrates, swifter animals should have larger eyes. A positive correlation between movement speed and eye size is a plausible hypothesis because faster-moving animals need to have a higher level of visual acuity to recognize food items and obstacles while they are still far away and because the ability of eyes to resolve images is known to increase with their size. A small number of empirical studies suggest that Leuckart’s Law is supported for mammals but rejected for birds. To better understand the conditions under which Leuckart’s Law holds, we conducted computer simulations of an animal moving on a plane that contains many food items as well as obstacles. The animal moves at a constant speed but changes its directional angle when it recognizes food items or obstacles. We examined the number of food items the animal consumed and the number of obstacles it collided with. Given a small cost of visual acuity, we obtained the optimal visual acuity, which depended on several parameters such as visible distance, visible angle, turning ability, movement speed, and densities of foods and obstacles in the field. Assuming that the animal’s visual acuity is close to the optimal value predicted by the model, Leuckart’s Law mostly holds when animals are in an environment with similar densities of food items and obstacles. The positive correlation between movement speed and visual distance was stronger with more obstacles and fewer food items. However, Leuckart’s Law may not hold if food is abundant, obstacles are rare, and collision damage is small.

Yusuke Ito

NAME

Yusuke Ito

Email: uks3tkwbft[at]gmail.com
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)
  • M.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2018 (Mathematical Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

(Ⅰ) Modeling nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection in vitro

Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) accumulates their mutants by both recombination and mutation during the course of the infection. HIV-1 recombination, as well as HIV-1 infection, is likely to be promoted more effectively by “co-infection” events. The co-infection of HIV-1 is defined that multiple viruses infect target cells simultaneously. Recently, it has been experimentally confirmed “nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection”, a phenomenon in which multiple viruses target cells in cell culture, occurs more frequently than it would be expected. One possible explanation for the nonrandomness is a heterogeneity of susceptibility of target cells, proposed by Q. Dang et al., 2004. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model for “nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection” and quantitatively analyzed the datasets of co-infection experiments. First, we derived the stochastic model including the heterogeneity of susceptibility of cells. Interestingly, the model allows us to predict theoretically that nonrandom HIV-1 co-infection is more likely to happen under our assumptions, as previous works have suggested experimentally. In addition, as the results of quantitative analyses of experimental co-infection datasets using the model, we could estimate the number of viruses to invade target cells under the nonrandom co-infection cases. These information will be useful for further understanding not only the impact of co-infections on the frequency of HIV-1 recombination but also the diversity of HIV-1.

Shoya Iwanami

NAME

Shoya Iwanami

Email: iwanamishoya[at]gmail.com
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)
  • M.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2018 (Mathematical Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Hematopoietic stem cell, Virus dynamics, Immunology, Osteoimmunology

PUBLICATIONS

[1] S. Iwanami, Y. Kakizoe, S. Morita, T. Miura, S. Nakaoka and S. Iwami. A highly pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus effectively produces infectious virions compared with a less pathogenic virus in cell culture, Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling. 14:9(2017).

Akane Hara

NAME

Akane Hara

Email: hara.akane32a[at]gmail.com
Please convert [at] to @ when you send an email.

CURRENT POSITION

Ph.D. candidate, Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University

EDUCATION

  • B.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2016 (Biology)
  • M.S. Kyushu University, Japan, 2018 (Mathematical Biology)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Allergy, regulatory T cells, helper T cells, and interaction between immune system and other systems.

PUBLICATIONS

[2] Hara, A., Nakaoka, S., and Aihara, K. (2018). Big-data analysis of allergy associations with gut microbiota. SEISAN KENKYU 70, 141-144.
[1] Hara, A., and Iwasa, Y. (2017). When is allergen immunotherapy effective? Journal of Theoretical Biology 425, 23-42.

to top